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slackware:samba [2018/11/02 20:16]
alien Small fixes to modernize the instructions.
slackware:samba [2018/11/21 21:07] (current)
alien CIFS is used nowadays by smbmount
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 On a linux client computer, it is the ''​smbmount''​ command that lets you mount a Samba (or a Windows!) share on the local filesystem. You can run the command manually in a console like this: <​code>​ On a linux client computer, it is the ''​smbmount''​ command that lets you mount a Samba (or a Windows!) share on the local filesystem. You can run the command manually in a console like this: <​code>​
-mount -t smbfs //​192.168.0.1/​public /​mnt/​samba/​bob/​public -o rw,​uid=0,​gid=10,​fmask=664,​dmask=775 -U <​some_special_user>​+mount -t cifs //​192.168.0.1/​public /​mnt/​samba/​bob/​public -o rw,​uid=0,​gid=10,​fmask=664,​dmask=775 -U <​some_special_user>​
 </​code>​ which will mount the share called //public// on our server called //bob// which has the IP Address ''​192.168.0.1''​ in this example. The mountpoint ''/​mnt/​samba/​bob/​public''​ must of course be created as a directory before. I chose ''/​mnt/​samba/​bob/​public''​ arbitrarily,​ I like looking at the mount point'​s name and be able to guess what it is all about. You are of course free to take another mount point.\\ The command mounts the share as user //<​some_special_user>//​ and it's up to you who that user account is, as long as it has the necessary access rights to the share. If the account has a password associated with it, you will be asked for it.\\ </​code>​ which will mount the share called //public// on our server called //bob// which has the IP Address ''​192.168.0.1''​ in this example. The mountpoint ''/​mnt/​samba/​bob/​public''​ must of course be created as a directory before. I chose ''/​mnt/​samba/​bob/​public''​ arbitrarily,​ I like looking at the mount point'​s name and be able to guess what it is all about. You are of course free to take another mount point.\\ The command mounts the share as user //<​some_special_user>//​ and it's up to you who that user account is, as long as it has the necessary access rights to the share. If the account has a password associated with it, you will be asked for it.\\
 The //-o rw,​uid=0,​gid=10,​fmask=664,​dmask=775//​ part means that the remote share will be mounted locally read/write, seemingly owned by user root:wheel (uid=0, gid=10) and with file- and directory masks that make the share'​s files and directories read/only for non-root, non-[[linux:​security#​wheel | wheel users]]. Having to type all this in order to mount the share is a tedious effort, so we take the easy way and add the following line to ''/​etc/​fstab'':​ <​code>​ The //-o rw,​uid=0,​gid=10,​fmask=664,​dmask=775//​ part means that the remote share will be mounted locally read/write, seemingly owned by user root:wheel (uid=0, gid=10) and with file- and directory masks that make the share'​s files and directories read/only for non-root, non-[[linux:​security#​wheel | wheel users]]. Having to type all this in order to mount the share is a tedious effort, so we take the easy way and add the following line to ''/​etc/​fstab'':​ <​code>​
-//​192.168.0.1/​public /​mnt/​samba/​bob/​public  ​smbfs rw,​uid=0,​gid=10,​fmask=664,​dmask=775,​credentials=/​etc/​bob.cred ​ 0 0+//​192.168.0.1/​public /​mnt/​samba/​bob/​public  ​cifs rw,​uid=0,​gid=10,​fmask=664,​dmask=775,​credentials=/​etc/​bob.cred ​ 0 0
 </​code>​ We store the username and password that we need for gaining access to the //public// share, in a file called ''/​etc/​bob.cred''​ which we protect from prying eyes by removing read access for all but the root user: <​code>​ </​code>​ We store the username and password that we need for gaining access to the //public// share, in a file called ''/​etc/​bob.cred''​ which we protect from prying eyes by removing read access for all but the root user: <​code>​
 chmod 600 /​etc/​bob.cred chmod 600 /​etc/​bob.cred
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 password = <​the_secret_word>​ password = <​the_secret_word>​
 </​code>​ Having this in our client computer'​s ''/​etc/​fstab''​ will cause the samba share to be automatically mounted when the computer boots. </​code>​ Having this in our client computer'​s ''/​etc/​fstab''​ will cause the samba share to be automatically mounted when the computer boots.
 +
 +<note tip>The older "''​smbfs''"​ kernel module is outdated while the "''​cifs''"​ kernel driver is well-maintained and supports higher versions of the SMB protocol than ''​smbfs''​. Samba implements the CIFS protocol (a dialect of the SMB protocol) and it supports SMB2 and parts of the SMB3 protocol extensions.</​note>​
 +
 +<note tip>The default CIFS protocol changed from SMB 1.0 to SMB 3.0 in kernel 4.13. If you are running an older Samba server and try to mount its shares on a recent Linux computer this changed default breaks the mounts. In order to force the mount to use SMB 1.0 you need to add "''​vers=1.0''"​ to the mount options</​note>​
  
 === Mixing protected and passwordless shares === === Mixing protected and passwordless shares ===

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